18 Tips on Using Social Media for Events [infographic]

Some great information, published in an easy and fun to consume way. Shared from http://www.christiankonline.com/social-media-for-events-infographic.

social-media-for-events

 

Advertisements

Non-Profit Social Media: How do Twitter and Facebook differ?

Today I came across this article 5 Important Differences Between Twitter and Facebook, and wondered “how can these differences affect the social media presence of non-profits?” Yes, I know, seems like I might have some invested interest in this topic. While I’m interested in social media strategy in general, I volunteer for a non-profit and am always looking for ways to get our message out. So here is what I gathered from this article.

While Twitter takes only about 13% of the US market, it’s often a more niche group of followers (minus all the spam of course!). And while “a Tweet has by far a much shorter lifespan than a Facebook update” there’s a better chance to reach someone who really cares about your cause. For example, the American Red Cross has been able to successfully translate Twitter support into donations for disaster relief. While this is an outlying case, without Twitter those funds would have been lost.

Sometimes I personally feel that Facebook “likes” are a way to make your followers think you identify with a brand’s message, even if you don’t. For example, someone might follow the American Cancer Society, because they generally care about their cause, but they won’t really engage with the brand by donating, reposting, or attending an event.

However, Facebook can be used for “timeless news and updates.” I see this as a big win for wanting to convey a steady message, or have a good timeline for events, relevant news and friend interaction. Used often, this could also be a great way to interact with friends by responding with rich feedback to posts. According to an article, Facebook: Is it Worth your Nonprofit’s Time? “80% of nonprofit staff said that Facebook helped them build better relationships with their existing constituents by helping nonprofits stay in touch and build community around their issue.”

So if I’m a non-profit, do I use Twitter, Facebook or both? I feel if you have a consistence flow of content and time, use both. There will be overlap somewhere, but with Twitter you can post quick and often, ideally more updates and interaction with  specific “interest.” And then with Facebook, a slower cadence of news and updates with people who “like” your actual organization. But remember that social media needs interaction from both sides! If someone DM (direct messages) you on Twitter, or posts a question on Facebook answer them back, and always thank people for “liking” or “following” you.

Want to read more about non-profit social media tips?

No need to geotag, reveal your location by ‘online dialect’

Cultural changes attributed to technology has always interested me, of course it’s hard not to these days. Take the recent coverage of Aflockalypse, and other mysterious mass animal deaths in the US. These are most likely attributed to technology, but not because there is some super microwave emitting weapon sucking power from all the cell phones and redirecting it, but because being more connected makes people more aware. According to the article Technology to blame for animal die-off panic “instant communications — especially when people can whip out smart phones to take pictures of critter carcasses and then post them on the Internet — is giving a skewed view of what is happening in the environment.” So when I saw this article about How tweets reveal where you’re from, I had to read it.

According to the article (which is not about cyber stalking or privacy, which the name seems to hint at), a study revealed that “where you’re from actually deals with how microblogging service reflects regional dialects and slang.” Carnegie Mellon University took a look at this in a study of “9,500 users and 380,000 messages.” During this study they found that, like traditional dialect, without knowing the actual location of these microbloggers, the could identify “regionalisms from spoken speech, such as Southerners’ “y’all” vs. Pittsburghers’ “yinz,” and the regional-based references to soda vs. pop vs. Coke.” And although unlike in real life where we can hear the accent, the study can determine your location within 300 miles because of the way you text, tweet, etc.

"Researchers clustered Twitter users based on the regional terms they included in their tweets. This map shows how tweets were clustered to reflect different characteristic regions, including Northern and Southern California, Chicago, the Lake Erie region, Boston, New York, Washington, Northern vs. Southern states, and Florida."

But why is this cool? According to the team, “The study shows that people continue to develop new ways of using language, regardless of whether they’re talking over lunch or exchanging messages on Twitter;” and shows that technology is having a direct impact on cultural evolution. The team is presenting their findings at the Linguistic Society of America annual meeting in Pittsburgh, you can get a copy of their work here.

Facebook’s “Event”… stay tuned for something anticlimactic

Zuckerberg’s official rebuttal to “The Social Network” has press clamoring to learn what will be unveiled at tomorrow’s press conference. I personally roll my eyes since Facebook is riding the coat-tails of “The Social Network,” which portrays Zuckerberg as “irreparably damaging and scathing.”

TechCrunch gives a good shot at guessing what all the fuss will be about tomorrow:

  • iPad: The lack of an official Facebook iPad app has been glaring since the device launched six months ago, and while some third party apps have stepped up to the plate (and done very well financially), a Facebook app is still nowhere to be seen.
  • (More) Places: Facebook Places launched in mid-August, and it’s still missing some key features, particularly on the desktop version of the website. Likewise, we could see a much larger campaign urging local businesses to become active on Facebook Places.
  • Credits: Facebook Credits are being used in more games (they frequently came up in the gaming event last month). But what about a broader launch that lets anyone use them?
  • The Facebook Bar – Facebook has been working on a Meebo Bar clone for ages now — they even announced it at f8. Where is it?
  • The Facebook Phone: They denied it existed. Then they said it sort of does. A full launch is the next logical step, obviously.
  • Update: As has been pointed out to us about a dozen times now, the invitation also uses the word ‘Event’, which could be a hint pointing to news around Facebook Events. Or maybe Facebook just used that word because it’s, you know, an event.

I think this announcement has something to do with a partnership, rather than an actual item…possibly Google and the mountain of personal data Facebook has been sitting on? I doubt it. I tend to think the buzz has grown too much, and we won’t be rewarded. And, like in the past with privacy adjustments etc, users have not been overly accepting of changes. Tech News World prints, “anything short of the sale of Facebook to Google, or purchase of Twitter by Facebook, will be anticlimactic,” joked Paul Levinson, head of the communications department at Fordham University.

Twitter on paper, Infographics

I wanted to share this because I find it so hard to visualize the chaotic mess that is Twitter. This was put together in April by Twitter’s co-founder and I think it does a great job of showing how big Twitter’s influence can be. Three things I think it’s missing are:

1. Is this worldwide or just US?
2. How many total people are “hooked” into the Internet?
3. What percentage are dormant accounts, spam or rarely used accounts?

From a marketing perspective these could be pretty helpful answers.

 

Thanks to Geek in Disguise for the orginal post.

Becoming a blogger in a mere 1/2 hour, sure enough!

I had the opportunity today to speak with Mel Carson, author of “How to be a Blogger in 30 Minutes Flat!” He talks about not worrying about creating a work of irrefutable text, and I actually enjoy the mindless jaunt threw the “so what factor” news. Give it a read, it made me think and snicker about my stacks of post-it notes littering my coffee table waiting to be typed up.